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Purchasing land.Follow

#1 Mar 19 2012 at 7:47 PM Rating: Good
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A few years ago, my parents looked into purchasing some land that was located between my house and the road. We wanted this land so no one would try to put a house near us. The owners lived out of state, clear across the country, and when contacted they replied in a somewhat rude way, saying we wouldn't be able to build on the land (not physically large enough for a house according to them) and we shouldn't be interested in it anyway.

Of course, it is large enough for a house, just large enough, which is why we don't want someone else owning it.

My parents left it at that. It's now 3 or 4 years later, and I want to try again. My father recommended seeing a real estate agent, and using them to handle it. I'm unfamiliar with the whole thing, and don't know how that would work. I'm curious why they would hold onto this land. Looking in the records at the register of deeds, it seems they have been delinquent on their tax payments a few times in the past 12 years. Never for a large amount, but it has frequent quite a few "CERTIFICATE OF FORFEITURE" listed under the owners' names for the land.

Is the real estate agent the best way to go, or should I just contact them again?
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#2 Mar 19 2012 at 7:53 PM Rating: Excellent
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If they live out of state and nothing is there then just put up a cheap fence around it, act like it is yours, problem solved.
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#3 Mar 19 2012 at 8:32 PM Rating: Excellent
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I don't think you can fence in someone else's property, but if you just pretend the land is yours, you can claim it via squatters rights at some point in the future.
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#4 Mar 19 2012 at 8:49 PM Rating: Good
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I am interested in legally owning the land, not faking it or trying to "steal" it using some outdated squatting laws that may/may not even exist in the State.

I'm more curious about the use of a real estate agent to try and purchase property that is not currently for sale. I've never heard of this, but then again, I'm not well experienced in property purchasing/sales.
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#5 Mar 19 2012 at 9:05 PM Rating: Good
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I'd try contacting them yourself again first. I doubt a realtor is going to be more successful if they're reluctant, and that way you aren't paying someone for a "no".
#6 Mar 19 2012 at 9:28 PM Rating: Decent
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If you cut the grass for a good number of years you can also try to get it through the squatter method. I'd have the realitor work on it and have him not say anything
about you or your family wanting to buy it.
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#7 Mar 19 2012 at 10:29 PM Rating: Excellent
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They probably don't want to sell it until the body decomposes.
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#8 Mar 19 2012 at 11:17 PM Rating: Good
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What's on the land--woods?
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#9 Mar 20 2012 at 4:19 AM Rating: Good
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idiggory, King of Bards wrote:
What's on the land--woods?


Ya, just undeveloped wooded land.
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#10 Mar 20 2012 at 9:26 AM Rating: Good
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Yep, definitely a body dump.
#11 Mar 21 2012 at 2:42 AM Rating: Good
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I would keep checking to see if they fall behind on the taxes and if they do you can pay them and worst casse is they have to pay you baack with interest or forfeit it to you. Though keep checking to see if they are willing to sell because you really don't need much land to build a house on think here in fla its either at or below a half acre really should see some of the subdivisions down here.
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#12 Mar 21 2012 at 7:52 AM Rating: Excellent
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Meh, if you're going to dispose of a body, you'll want to wrap it in plastic wrap and encase it in the cement of your building's foundation. Just tossing it into the woods leaves you vulnerable to discovery. Some random wild animal dragging a piece and leaving it in a populated area won't help you much at that point. Dogs are really good at finding the rest after that point. Not that I've ever thought of it. Also, and completely unrelated to the discussion, I'm renovating the garage.
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#13 Mar 21 2012 at 8:21 AM Rating: Good
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I'm with the others who mentioned squatters rights. If they don't want to sell it but aren't maintaining it, look into your State squatting laws. Given enough time, you can legally own the land.
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#14 Mar 21 2012 at 4:23 PM Rating: Good
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I think going the "squatter's rights" route (apparently called "Adverse Possession") is not easily done, and even harder on undeveloped land that I would prefer to stay undeveloped.

My house has been here since 1996, so I meet the required 15 years, but I have to be able to show that it's been 15 years of continuous, exclusive, open, adverse use.

That is hard to show on undeveloped land. I've left it alone behind my house, hoping no one would build on it. I have in the past told people to stop cutting down trees on the land, and my parents got into a small arguement with a man who claimed to know the people and was taking trees for firewood. Turns out he didn't, and he was just cutting down the trees without permission.

I'm going to send a letter to the owners this week, hopefully they will agree to sell it.
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#15 Mar 21 2012 at 4:56 PM Rating: Decent
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TirithRR wrote:
I think going the "squatter's rights" route (apparently called "Adverse Possession") is not easily done, and even harder on undeveloped land that I would prefer to stay undeveloped.

My house has been here since 1996, so I meet the required 15 years, but I have to be able to show that it's been 15 years of continuous, exclusive, open, adverse use.

That is hard to show on undeveloped land. I've left it alone behind my house, hoping no one would build on it. I have in the past told people to stop cutting down trees on the land, and my parents got into a small arguement with a man who claimed to know the people and was taking trees for firewood. Turns out he didn't, and he was just cutting down the trees without permission.

I'm going to send a letter to the owners this week, hopefully they will agree to sell it.


On top of that generally the owners need to be aware that you are using and maintaining the land for adverse possession to take effect.
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#16 Mar 21 2012 at 5:23 PM Rating: Good
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Peimei wrote:
TirithRR wrote:
I think going the "squatter's rights" route (apparently called "Adverse Possession") is not easily done, and even harder on undeveloped land that I would prefer to stay undeveloped.

My house has been here since 1996, so I meet the required 15 years, but I have to be able to show that it's been 15 years of continuous, exclusive, open, adverse use.

That is hard to show on undeveloped land. I've left it alone behind my house, hoping no one would build on it. I have in the past told people to stop cutting down trees on the land, and my parents got into a small arguement with a man who claimed to know the people and was taking trees for firewood. Turns out he didn't, and he was just cutting down the trees without permission.

I'm going to send a letter to the owners this week, hopefully they will agree to sell it.


On top of that generally the owners need to be aware that you are using and maintaining the land for adverse possession to take effect.


Actually I think that would nullify adverse possession. I found this little blurb that does a pretty good job of explaining the whole thing.
http://davidphillipsmichigan.blogspot.com/2008/08/michigans-adverse-possession-doctrine.html

If the owner knew, and allowed it to happen, then the occupation would not be adverse. The owner would just be allowing the person to be using it. I think the owners being unaware for the whole 15 years actually helps the case if you are trying to use adverse possession. The people didn't care enough about the land, and you did.
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