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#1852 Sep 16 2015 at 4:54 PM Rating: Excellent
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gbaji wrote:
Because the restrictions to the doctor performing the abortion apply if the research the tissues were obtained for is funded by the government.

Except that you would also then have to prove that the broker was getting the tissue specifically for that research and not getting tissue to meet general demand, both federally funded and private.
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A. You haven't shown that the research wasn't federally funded.

I don't need to. You're accusing PP of a crime, the burden of evidence falls solely on you.
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B. The same restriction applies to non-federally funded research.

If you're illiterate, I suppose.
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So... You lose?

Heh.

Edited, Sep 16th 2015 5:56pm by Jophiel
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#1853 Sep 16 2015 at 6:55 PM Rating: Excellent
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This debate is the boringest boring to ever bore. No one is going to make it through three hours of this.
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Wow. Regular ol' Joph fan club in here.
#1854 Sep 16 2015 at 7:01 PM Rating: Decent
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Jophiel wrote:
This debate is the boringest boring to ever bore. No one is going to make it through three hours of this.


Dunno, Bush reminding Trump that he tried to bribe him was kinda nice.

Also, I am mildly annoyed that Kim was barely mentioned, but defunding planned parenthood is pursued the way one would pursue constitutional amendment.

Edited, Sep 16th 2015 9:04pm by angrymnk
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Jar the Sam
#1855 Sep 16 2015 at 7:19 PM Rating: Excellent
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Nah, they already lost me. I'll catch the highlight reel tomorrow.
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Wow. Regular ol' Joph fan club in here.
#1856 Sep 16 2015 at 7:53 PM Rating: Good
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I'm just amused at how hard they'll fight for a baby to be born and have absolutely nothing to do with it after it leaves the womb. Well, except maybe deport it.
Cruz wrote:
We've all done great things, or we wouldn't be on this stage.
The exact moment Jon Stewart regretted leaving the Daily Show so early.

"You're the best interview in America" isn't necessarily a compliment, Mr. Trump.
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#1857 Sep 16 2015 at 8:05 PM Rating: Decent
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lolgaxe wrote:
I'm just amused at how hard they'll fight for a baby to be born and have absolutely nothing to do with it after it leaves the womb. Well, except maybe deport it.
Cruz wrote:
We've all done great things, or we wouldn't be on this stage.
The exact moment Jon Stewart regretted leaving the Daily Show so early.

"You're the best interview in America" isn't necessarily a compliment, Mr. Trump.


End birth citizenship; they will be taking our jobs. Marco didn't sound half bad ( compared to the rest ).

Edited, Sep 16th 2015 10:22pm by angrymnk
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#1858 Sep 16 2015 at 8:18 PM Rating: Good
Worst. Title. Ever!
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We have spent the last <number> minutes talking about <topic>.

She may have created a drinking game.
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#1859 Sep 17 2015 at 7:23 AM Rating: Good
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Bush wrote:
When we pull back, voids are created.
Buy the boat, shoot holes in the boat, sell the boat, blame the new owner for it sinking.

Not that Paul's suggestion of arming Al Qaeda to fight Russia ISIS was any more enlightened.
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#1860 Sep 17 2015 at 7:34 AM Rating: Excellent
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The candidates seemed to be under some weird delusion that Syria and Russia haven't been tight for decades (Russia has a friggin' naval port in Syria). Or that the US is squandering some alliance with Syria that never existed. "Putin is going to tell the Saudis that the US won't help them"? Based on... the state of US-Saudi relations which isn't anything remotely like US-Syrian relations?
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Wow. Regular ol' Joph fan club in here.
#1861 Sep 17 2015 at 12:21 PM Rating: Good
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lolgaxe wrote:
So a government employee got himself shot during a parade around here . . .
I just thought I'd mention, since we're talking about a human life, that he died today. Although, it is important to also note that the political posturinguproar about gun violence that sprang up after this shooting died a week ago, a day or two after this man was shot.

His name was Carey Gabay and he was a first deputy general counsel at the Empire State Development Corporation.

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#1862 Sep 17 2015 at 1:39 PM Rating: Good
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Now, see, there's a guy that brought himself up and made something of himself. A whole "a wrong public servant is dead" moment.
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#1863 Sep 23 2015 at 3:44 AM Rating: Good
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The original "Happy Birthday" song is effectively copyright free.

Quote:
None of the companies that have collected royalties on the "Happy Birthday" song for the past 80 years held a valid copyright claim to one of the most popular songs in history, a federal judge in Los Angeles ruled on Tuesday.

In a stunning reversal of decades of copyright claims, the judge ruled that Warner/Chappell never had the right to charge for the use of the "Happy Birthday To You" song. Warner had been enforcing a copyright since 1988, when it bought Birch Tree Group, the successor to Clayton F. Summy Co., which claimed the original disputed copyright.

Judge George H. King ruled that a copyright filed by the Summy Co. in 1935 granted only the rights to specific piano arrangements of the music, not the actual song.

"'Happy Birthday' is finally free after 80 years," said Randall Newman, an attorney for the plaintiffs in the suit, which included a group of filmmakers who are producing a documentary about the song. "Finally, the charade is over. It's unbelievable."

A spokesman for Warner/Chappell, the publishing arm of Warner Music, said, "We are looking at the court's lengthy opinion and considering our options."

The plaintiffs' attorneys had characterized the years-long legal fight as a David vs. Goliath battle that pitted independent filmmakers against a large corporation collecting profits on a song whose authors had long since died.

Until now, Warner has asked for royalties from anyone who wanted to sing or play “Happy Birthday to You” -- with the lyrics -- as part of a profit-making enterprise. Royalties were most often collected from stage productions, television shows, movies or greeting cards. But even those who wanted to sing the song publicly as part of a business, say a restaurant owner giving out free birthday cake to patrons, technically had to pay to use the song, prompting creative renditions at chain eateries trying to avoid paying royalties.

The fact that the birthday tune can't be played or sung without permission from Warner has been little more than a surprising piece of trivia for most, but for Warner Music Group, it has meant big business. Two of the filmmaker plaintiffs paid $1,500 and $3,000 for the rights to use the song, their attorneys said. Filmmaker Steve James paid Warner $5,000 to use the song in his 1994 documentary "Hoop Dreams."

"It was quite expensive for us at that time and with our budget. And we only used it for 9 seconds," James wrote in an email passed along by his publicist. James said the scene was "essential" to the film and ultimately decided to pay up.

At a March hearing in the case, records show, a Warner/Chappell representative seated in the audience told the judge that the company collects as much as "six figures" for certain single uses of the song. The song brings in about $2 million a year in royalties for Warner, according to some estimates.

The complex saga of the six-note ditty has spanned more than 120 years, withstanding two world wars and several eras of copyright law. The song has seen the rise and fall of vinyl records, cassette tapes, CDs and now, the era of digital streaming music.

The story began in 1893, with a Kentucky schoolteacher and her older sister. Patty Smith Hill and Mildred J. Hill wrote the song for Patty’s kindergarten students, titling it “Good Morning To All.” The original lyrics Patty wrote were: “Good morning to you / Good morning to you / Good morning, dear children / Good morning to all."

Patty later said that she had worked with her sister to compose a simple melody to match the words that could be easily sung by young children.

The sisters published the song in a book called “Song Stories for the Kindergarten,” and assigned the copyright to their publisher, Clayton F. Summy Co., in exchange for a cut of the sales.

That was only the beginning of the tangled web of copyright law various attorneys have argued may or may not apply to one of the world’s most famous songs.

Warner and the plaintiffs both agreed that the melody of the familiar song, first written as "Good Morning To All," had entered the public domain decades ago. But Warner claimed it still owned the rights to the "Happy Birthday" lyrics, leaning on the 1935 copyright claim.

At various turns in the case, attorneys argued over whether the Hill sisters had actually written the song, whether they had "abandoned" their rights to what became the "Happy Birthday" tune and even whether Patty Smith Hill had been accurately quoted in a 1935 Time magazine article about the song.

It is not entirely clear, the judge ruled, that the Hill sisters wrote the lyrics for "Happy Birthday To You." But either way, they never asserted a copyright claim for the lyrics, even though they sued for the rights to the original melody.

Ultimately, the judge ruled that no evidence existed that the Summy Co. -- the original company to assert a copyright claim -- ever legally obtained the rights to the "Happy Birthday To You" song from whomever wrote it.

Tuesday's ruling means that the song is now considered a public work and is free for everyone to use without fear of having to pay for it, according to a statement from the plaintiffs' attorneys.

Jennifer Nelson, one of the filmmaker plaintiffs and owner of Good Morning to You productions, called the decision a "great victory for musicians, artists and people around the world who have waited decades for this."

Robert Brauneis, a George Washington University law professor who has extensively researched the copyright history of the song, says the ruling does not explicitly place "Happy Birthday To You" in the public domain.

"It does leave open some questions," Brauneis said Tuesday night. "If [the Hill sisters] didn't convey the rights to Summy Co., then is there someone else that might still own them?"

With Mildred Hill dead for nearly a century now, Brauneis said, "Figuring out who owned [the rights] at this point would be quite an interesting job."

The plaintiff's attorneys have said that they will move to qualify the lawsuit as a class-action in an effort to recoup millions of dollars in licensing fees Warner/Chappell has collected on the tune over the years.

Mark C. Rifkin, one of Nelson's attorneys, said the plaintiffs will pursue Warner for royalties paid since "at least" 1988, and could also ask the company to repay royalties that have been collected all the way back to 1935. It's not clear how much money that could entail.

A third of the profits from licensing the song still go to a designated charity of the Hill family, the Association for Childhood Education International, which promotes global education efforts for children and the professional growth of educators. The association’s 2012 nonprofit tax return, the most recent available, indicates it received $754,108 in royalties.

Warner could still appeal King's decision, but it will have to ask the judge to permit an appeal to go forward. The company has not indicated that it will do so.
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"We don't just borrow words; on occasion, English has pursued other languages down alleyways to beat them unconscious and rifle their pockets for new vocabulary."
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#1864 Sep 23 2015 at 5:56 AM Rating: Excellent
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Appropriate!
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#1865 Sep 23 2015 at 6:49 AM Rating: Decent
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Shaowstrike the Shady wrote:
The original "Happy Birthday" song is effectively copyright free.

Quote:
None of the companies that have collected royalties on the "Happy Birthday" song for the past 80 years held a valid copyright claim to one of the most popular songs in history, a federal judge in Los Angeles ruled on Tuesday.

In a stunning reversal of decades of copyright claims, the judge ruled that Warner/Chappell never had the right to charge for the use of the "Happy Birthday To You" song. Warner had been enforcing a copyright since 1988, when it bought Birch Tree Group, the successor to Clayton F. Summy Co., which claimed the original disputed copyright.

Judge George H. King ruled that a copyright filed by the Summy Co. in 1935 granted only the rights to specific piano arrangements of the music, not the actual song.

"'Happy Birthday' is finally free after 80 years," said Randall Newman, an attorney for the plaintiffs in the suit, which included a group of filmmakers who are producing a documentary about the song. "Finally, the charade is over. It's unbelievable."

A spokesman for Warner/Chappell, the publishing arm of Warner Music, said, "We are looking at the court's lengthy opinion and considering our options."

The plaintiffs' attorneys had characterized the years-long legal fight as a David vs. Goliath battle that pitted independent filmmakers against a large corporation collecting profits on a song whose authors had long since died.

Until now, Warner has asked for royalties from anyone who wanted to sing or play “Happy Birthday to You” -- with the lyrics -- as part of a profit-making enterprise. Royalties were most often collected from stage productions, television shows, movies or greeting cards. But even those who wanted to sing the song publicly as part of a business, say a restaurant owner giving out free birthday cake to patrons, technically had to pay to use the song, prompting creative renditions at chain eateries trying to avoid paying royalties.

The fact that the birthday tune can't be played or sung without permission from Warner has been little more than a surprising piece of trivia for most, but for Warner Music Group, it has meant big business. Two of the filmmaker plaintiffs paid $1,500 and $3,000 for the rights to use the song, their attorneys said. Filmmaker Steve James paid Warner $5,000 to use the song in his 1994 documentary "Hoop Dreams."

"It was quite expensive for us at that time and with our budget. And we only used it for 9 seconds," James wrote in an email passed along by his publicist. James said the scene was "essential" to the film and ultimately decided to pay up.

At a March hearing in the case, records show, a Warner/Chappell representative seated in the audience told the judge that the company collects as much as "six figures" for certain single uses of the song. The song brings in about $2 million a year in royalties for Warner, according to some estimates.

The complex saga of the six-note ditty has spanned more than 120 years, withstanding two world wars and several eras of copyright law. The song has seen the rise and fall of vinyl records, cassette tapes, CDs and now, the era of digital streaming music.

The story began in 1893, with a Kentucky schoolteacher and her older sister. Patty Smith Hill and Mildred J. Hill wrote the song for Patty’s kindergarten students, titling it “Good Morning To All.” The original lyrics Patty wrote were: “Good morning to you / Good morning to you / Good morning, dear children / Good morning to all."

Patty later said that she had worked with her sister to compose a simple melody to match the words that could be easily sung by young children.

The sisters published the song in a book called “Song Stories for the Kindergarten,” and assigned the copyright to their publisher, Clayton F. Summy Co., in exchange for a cut of the sales.

That was only the beginning of the tangled web of copyright law various attorneys have argued may or may not apply to one of the world’s most famous songs.

Warner and the plaintiffs both agreed that the melody of the familiar song, first written as "Good Morning To All," had entered the public domain decades ago. But Warner claimed it still owned the rights to the "Happy Birthday" lyrics, leaning on the 1935 copyright claim.

At various turns in the case, attorneys argued over whether the Hill sisters had actually written the song, whether they had "abandoned" their rights to what became the "Happy Birthday" tune and even whether Patty Smith Hill had been accurately quoted in a 1935 Time magazine article about the song.

It is not entirely clear, the judge ruled, that the Hill sisters wrote the lyrics for "Happy Birthday To You." But either way, they never asserted a copyright claim for the lyrics, even though they sued for the rights to the original melody.

Ultimately, the judge ruled that no evidence existed that the Summy Co. -- the original company to assert a copyright claim -- ever legally obtained the rights to the "Happy Birthday To You" song from whomever wrote it.

Tuesday's ruling means that the song is now considered a public work and is free for everyone to use without fear of having to pay for it, according to a statement from the plaintiffs' attorneys.

Jennifer Nelson, one of the filmmaker plaintiffs and owner of Good Morning to You productions, called the decision a "great victory for musicians, artists and people around the world who have waited decades for this."

Robert Brauneis, a George Washington University law professor who has extensively researched the copyright history of the song, says the ruling does not explicitly place "Happy Birthday To You" in the public domain.

"It does leave open some questions," Brauneis said Tuesday night. "If [the Hill sisters] didn't convey the rights to Summy Co., then is there someone else that might still own them?"

With Mildred Hill dead for nearly a century now, Brauneis said, "Figuring out who owned [the rights] at this point would be quite an interesting job."

The plaintiff's attorneys have said that they will move to qualify the lawsuit as a class-action in an effort to recoup millions of dollars in licensing fees Warner/Chappell has collected on the tune over the years.

Mark C. Rifkin, one of Nelson's attorneys, said the plaintiffs will pursue Warner for royalties paid since "at least" 1988, and could also ask the company to repay royalties that have been collected all the way back to 1935. It's not clear how much money that could entail.

A third of the profits from licensing the song still go to a designated charity of the Hill family, the Association for Childhood Education International, which promotes global education efforts for children and the professional growth of educators. The association’s 2012 nonprofit tax return, the most recent available, indicates it received $754,108 in royalties.

Warner could still appeal King's decision, but it will have to ask the judge to permit an appeal to go forward. The company has not indicated that it will do so.


Wow. Sudden outbreak of common sense. Scary stuff. I mean it only took 80 years in a culture that throws everything away as soon as it is bored ( within 5 minutes ), but the thought is nice..
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#1866 Sep 23 2015 at 7:14 AM Rating: Excellent
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If this means they stop singing that "Happy-Happy Birthday!" knock off at TGI Fridays and like restaurants, I'm all for it.
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Wow. Regular ol' Joph fan club in here.
#1867 Sep 23 2015 at 7:39 AM Rating: Good
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article wrote:
Jennifer Nelson, one of the filmmaker plaintiffs and owner of Good Morning to You productions, called the decision a "great victory for musicians, artists and people around the world who have waited decades for this."
Waited for decades with bated breath, no less. Truly a turning point in human history. World peace is just around the corner.
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#1868 Sep 23 2015 at 8:03 AM Rating: Excellent
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Amazon Prime is on sale this Friday for $67 (down from $99) to celebrate Transparent winning its Emmy awards.

"New members only" but, with previous new member only deals, I believe you were able to buy it as a gift and then send it to yourself.
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Wow. Regular ol' Joph fan club in here.
#1869 Sep 23 2015 at 9:03 AM Rating: Good
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Our Prime Minister ****** a dead pig.

Edited, Sep 23rd 2015 11:03am by Kavekkk
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#1870 Sep 23 2015 at 9:07 AM Rating: Excellent
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Kavekkk wrote:
Our Prime Minister ****** a dead pig.
Man, when they said the Muppets were aimed at a more mature audience, they weren't kidding.
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#1871 Sep 23 2015 at 9:24 AM Rating: Excellent
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Is that better or worse than fucking a live pig? I mean, if someone stuck their dick in a Thanksgiving turkey that would be pretty gross but less gross than if he held down a turkey and went to town on its cloaca. Less impressive, too. I bet a turkey could put up one hell of a fight.

Edited, Sep 23rd 2015 10:24am by Jophiel
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#1872 Sep 23 2015 at 9:45 AM Rating: Good
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That's what makes it so bad, that he lacked the ambition to go the full hog.
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#1873 Sep 23 2015 at 10:00 AM Rating: Good
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#1874 Sep 23 2015 at 10:03 AM Rating: Excellent
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Blonde white women, getting away with murder!
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#1875 Sep 23 2015 at 10:06 AM Rating: Good
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Attempted murder, anyway.
#1876 Sep 23 2015 at 10:06 AM Rating: Excellent
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I'm always curious about the thought process that goes into a jury decision like that. Assuming there is any.
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